Ottofen

Ottofen, a brand name for a formulation containing essential Ibuprofen, is widely used for various health benefits. This guide provides comprehensive information on the uses, dosage, side effects, and mechanism of action of Ottofen, as well as insights into how long it takes to work. Understanding these aspects can help you make informed decisions about its use and effectiveness.

Introduction

Ottofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat fever, pain, stiffness and swelling caused by inflammation. It is sold over the counter and is commonly used to reduce aches and pains due to dental work, minor injuries, menstrual cramps, headaches, colds, and other minor ailments.

Uses For Ottofen

Ottofen is commonly used to treat pain, fever and inflammation, although it can have other uses as well. It can be used to reduce fever, reduce menstrual cramps, reduce minor aches and pains due to dental work, colds, and headaches, help with the symptoms of allergies, and reduce inflammation caused by minor injuries. Ottofen has also been used to treat conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis.

Mechanism of Action

Ottofen works by blocking the action of an enzyme called cyclooxygenase (COX). COX is responsible for the production of prostaglandins, which are hormones that can increase inflammation and cause pain. By blocking the action of this enzyme, ibuprofen helps to reduce inflammation and pain.

How Long Does it Take to Work?

The length of time it takes for ibuprofen to start working will depend on the dosage and method of administration. For example, when taken as a pill, ibuprofen typically starts working within 30 minutes, and the full effects can take up to two hours. If administered as an intravenous injection, the effects can begin within minutes.

Absorption

Ottofen is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract after oral administration, with peak concentrations in the blood occurring in 30 to 60 minutes. It is metabolized in the liver and is eliminated primarily by the kidneys.

Route Of Elimination

Ottofen is eliminated primarily by the kidneys, with less than 10% remaining unaltered. The elimination half-life is 1 to 2 hours.

Dosage

The recommended dose for ibuprofen is 200 to 400 mg taken orally every four to six hours as needed, not to exceed 3,200 mg per day. Ottofen can be taken with or without food. Lower doses may be recommended for elderly patients or those with kidney or liver disease. Higher doses cannot be recommended.

Administration

Ottofen can be taken orally, either as a tablet, capsule, or syrup. It can also be administered intravenously. Ottofen can also be applied topically as a cream, although this is not as effective as a systemic (oral or intravenous) dose.

Side Effects

Common side effects of ibuprofen include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, heartburn, dizziness, drowsiness, and headaches. Other rare but serious side effects can include stroke, heart attack, stomach bleeding, and kidney problems.

Toxicity

The recommended doses of ibuprofen are generally well-tolerated. However, higher doses may cause toxicity, including central nervous system (CNS) depression, liver and kidney damage, and electrolyte imbalances. Signs and symptoms of ibuprofen toxicity include dizziness, confusion, weakness, tachycardia, hypotension, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain.

Precaution

Ottofen should be used with caution in patients with a history of ulcers, liver, or kidney disease, bleeding problems, heart disease, or stroke. It is not recommended for children or pregnant women, and it should not be used concurrently with other NSAIDs or alcohol.

Interaction

Ottofen can interact with other medications, so it is important to inform your doctor or pharmacist about all medications you are taking before taking ibuprofen. This includes both prescription and over-the-counter medications, as well as any herbal or dietary supplements you may be taking.

Disease Interaction

Ottofen can interact with certain medical conditions. It should not be used by patients with bleeding disorders, kidney or liver disease, or those taking other NSAIDs or anticoagulants. Ottofen can also interact with certain other medications to increase the risk of side effects, so it is important to inform your doctor or pharmacist about all medications you are taking before taking ibuprofen.

Drug Interaction

Ottofen can interact with other medications, including antibiotics, anticoagulants, lithium, methotrexate, blood pressure medications and blood thinners. It can also interact with certain supplements and herbal remedies. It is important to inform your doctor or pharmacist about all medications you are taking before taking ibuprofen.

Food Interactions

Ottofen may interact with certain foods. These foods include alcohol, dairy products, and grapefruit juice. It is important to inform your doctor or pharmacist about all foods and drinks you consume while taking ibuprofen.

Pregnancy Use

Ottofen should not be used during pregnancy, except in certain circumstances approved by a doctor. It is important to inform your doctor or pharmacist if you are pregnant or breastfeeding before taking ibuprofen.

Lactation Use

Ottofen should not be used while breastfeeding, as it can pass into breast milk and can cause unwanted side effects for the baby. It is important to inform your doctor or pharmacist if you are breastfeeding before taking ibuprofen.

Acute Overdose

An acute overdose of ibuprofen can cause serious side effects. Symptoms of an overdose include drowsiness, stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, stomach bleeding, and kidney failure. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical help immediately.

Contraindication

Ottofen is contraindicated for patients with a history of an allergic reaction to ibuprofen or other NSAIDs, those with a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding, as well as those with severe kidney or liver disease. It is also contraindicated in patients taking other NSAIDs or anticoagulants.

Use Direction

Ottofen should be taken as directed by your doctor or pharmacist. The recommended dose is 200 to 400 mg taken orally every four to six hours as needed, not to exceed 3,200 mg per day. Ottofen can be taken with or without food.

Storage Condition

Ottofen should be stored at room temperature and away from direct heat and sunlight. It should be kept out of reach of children. Do not freeze. Do not take ibuprofen if it has expired or is outdated.

Volume of Distribution

The volume of distribution of ibuprofen is 0.2 to 0.7 L/kg. This means that it distributes throughout the body quickly after being taken orally or intravenously.

Half Life

The half-life of ibuprofen is 1 to 2 hours. This means that after a dose of ibuprofen, half of the drug will be eliminated from the body after 1 to 2 hours.

Clearance

The clearance of ibuprofen is 33 to 70 mL/min/1.73m2. This means that it is quickly cleared from the body after a dose is taken.

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