Keter

Keter, a brand name for a formulation containing essential Ketorolac, is widely used for various health benefits. This guide provides comprehensive information on the uses, dosage, side effects, and mechanism of action of Keter, as well as insights into how long it takes to work. Understanding these aspects can help you make informed decisions about its use and effectiveness.

Keter

Keter, also known as toradol, is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to treat pain and inflammation. It is available without a prescription for the relief of mild to moderate pain, but may be administered in a hospital for more severe pain.

Uses for

Keter is used to relieve moderate to severe pain, including pain after surgery and pain from injuries. It can be used to treat pain associated with sprains, strains, tendonitis, myositis, bursitis, discitis, periodontal abscess, and dental surgery. It is also used to reduce fever and pain associated with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Mechanism of Action

Keter works by reducing hormones that cause pain and inflammation in the body. It stops the production of prostaglandins, which are compounds in the body that can cause pain, inflammation, and fever. By inhibiting the formation of these compounds, ketorolac can reduce pain and inflammation.

How long does it take to work?

Keter usually begins to work within 30 minutes of taking it. The effects of the medication can last up to 6 hours.

Absorption

Keter is rapidly and completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. It has an absolute bioavailability of approximately 70%.

Route of Elimination

Keter is eliminated mainly through the kidneys as metabolites or unchanged drug. It is also excreted in small amounts in the bile.

Dosage

The recommended dose of Keter is 10-60 mg every 4-6 hours, with a maximum dose of 120 mg per day. The maximum duration of treatment is 5 days.

Administration

Keter can be taken orally or administered intravenously. It is usually taken with food or milk to minimize the risk of stomach upset.

Side Effects

Some common side effects of ketorolac may include headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, heartburn, and increased risk of bleeding or stomach ulcers. Less common side effects may include dizziness, rash, and unusual bleeding or bruising.

Toxicity

Keter is generally safe and well tolerated when taken as directed. However, taking high doses or using for long periods of time can increase the risk of side effects, including kidney damage, gastrointestinal bleeding, and stomach ulcers. Overdose can occur if more than the recommended dose is taken.

Precautions

Patients should tell their doctor or healthcare provider if they have had any type of surgery, kidney or liver disease, asthma, heart disease, bleeding disorders, or any other medical conditions before taking ketorolac. It is important to tell the doctor or healthcare provider about all the medicines taken, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Interactions

Keter can interact with other medications, including other anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulants, lithium, methotrexate, and other NSAIDs. Patients should tell their doctor or healthcare provider about all the medicines taken in order to avoid any potential drug interactions.

Disease Interactions

Keter may interact with certain diseases, including kidney or liver disease, asthma, recent surgery, bleeding disorders, heart disease, and other medical conditions. Patients should tell their doctor or healthcare provider about any medical conditions before taking ketorolac.

Drug Interactions

Keter can interact with other medications, including other NSAIDs, anticoagulants, lithium, methotrexate, and other prescription and non-prescription medications. Patients should tell their doctor or healthcare provider about all the medicines taken in order to avoid any potential drug interactions.

Food Interactions

Keter should be taken with food or milk to reduce the risk of stomach upset. It is important to tell the doctor or healthcare provider about any dietary supplements or vitamins taken in order to avoid any potential food interactions.

Pregnancy Use

Keter should not be used by pregnant women, unless specifically recommended by a doctor. Use of this medication during the third trimester of pregnancy may cause side effects in the baby. Patients should tell their doctor or healthcare provider if they are pregnant before starting this medication.

Lactation Use

Keter should not be used while breastfeeding, unless specifically recommended by a doctor. Patients should tell their doctor or healthcare provider if they are breastfeeding before starting this medication.

Acute Overdose

Acute overdose of ketorolac can cause excessive sedation, hypotension, shock, coma, and death. If significant amounts have been ingested, contact a poison control center for advice.

Contraindication

Keter should not be used in patients with active peptic ulcer, bleeding problems, kidney or liver dysfunction, known hypersensitivity or allergy to this medication, or in patients who are taking other medications that interact with ketorolac.

Use Direction

Keter comes in tablet or intravenous form and is to be taken or administered according to directions provided by a doctor or healthcare provider. Patients should tell their doctor or healthcare provider if they are pregnant or breastfeeding before starting this medication.

Storage Condition

Keter should be stored in a cool, dry place, away from light and moisture. Keep all medication out of the reach of children.

Volume of Distribution

Keter has a volume of distribution of 0.6-1.2 L/kg.

Half Life

Keter has a half-life of 4-6 hours.

Clearance

Keter has a clearance of 2-4 L/h.

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