Clofre

Clofre, a brand name for a formulation containing essential Clopidogrel, is widely used for various health benefits. This guide provides comprehensive information on the uses, dosage, side effects, and mechanism of action of Clofre, as well as insights into how long it takes to work. Understanding these aspects can help you make informed decisions about its use and effectiveness.

Introduction

Clofre is an antiplatelet medication used to reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular deaths in people with heart disease. It is also used to reduce the risk of recurring chest pain caused by a heart attack. Clofre works by preventing platelets in the blood from sticking together and forming clots that can lead to a stroke or heart attack.

Uses for

Clofre is used to reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular death in people with existing heart disease or who are at high risk of developing heart disease. It is also used to reduce the risk of recurrent chest pain caused by a heart attack. It is not used to treat chest pain when it occurs.

Mechanism of Action

Clofre prevents platelets from sticking together and forming clots that can lead to a stroke or heart attack. It does this by inhibiting the action of an enzyme called platelet activating factor (PAF). By blocking PAF, clopidogrel prevents the platelets from clumping together, which reduces the risk of stroke and heart attack.

How Long Does It Take To Work?

Clofre usually begins to work within 1 week of starting treatment. However, it may take up to 4 weeks for the full benefits of the medication to be seen.

Absorption

Clofre is rapidly and completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract after oral administration. The maximum plasma concentration is achieved 1 to 2 hours after oral administration.

Route of Elimination

Clofre is eliminated primarily by the liver. It is metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 and excreted in the feces. A small amount is also excreted in the urine.

Dosage

Clofre is taken orally in tablet form. The usual adult dose is 75 mg once daily without regard to meals. Dosage may be increased to 150 mg daily in some patients. The dose should not exceed 150 mg per day. Your doctor may adjust your dose based on your blood work or other medications you are taking.

Administration

Clofre should be taken with food. Swallow the tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not break, crush, or chew the tablet.

Side Effect

Common side effects of Clofre include headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, rash, and fatigue. More serious side effects may include anemia, pancreatitis, gingival bleeding, heart rhythm disturbances, and thrombocytopenia.

Toxicity

Clofre has an LD50 of 5500 mg/kg in rats. Toxicity is rare except in cases of accidental overdose or in patients with liver or kidney damage taking large doses.

Precaution

Patients taking Clofre should avoid consuming alcohol as it can increase the risk of bleeding. Other drugs that may interact with Clofre include aspirin, NSAIDs, and warfarin. Tell your doctor about any medications you are taking before taking Clofre.

Interaction

Clofre may interact with other medications, including aspirin, NSAIDs, and warfarin. Tell your doctor about any medications you are taking before taking Clofre.

Disease Interaction

Clofre may interact with certain diseases, such as liver or kidney damage. It is important to tell your doctor about any diseases you may have before taking Clofre.

Drug Interaction

Certain drugs can interact with Clofre, including aspirin, NSAIDs, and warfarin. Tell your doctor about any medications you are taking before taking Clofre.

Food Interactions

Clofre should be taken with food. Avoid unhealthy fats (including trans fats) as they may reduce the absorption of Clofre and lower its effectiveness. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with Clofre and should be avoided.

Pregnancy Use

Clofre is classified as a Pregnancy Category C medication, which means that it is not known if it can harm an unborn baby. It is important to tell your doctor if you are pregnant or suspect you are pregnant before taking Clofre.

Lactation Use

Clofre should not be taken by breastfeeding women. It is not known if clopidogrel is excreted in human milk and it is not recommended for use during breastfeeding.

Acute Overdose

An overdose of clopidogrel may cause bleeding, difficulty breathing, or dizziness. If you or someone you know has taken an overdose of clopidogrel, seek immediate medical attention.

Contraindication

Clofre should not be used in patients who are hypersensitive to it, in patients with active bleeding, or in pregnant or breastfeeding women. Clofre should also not be used in patients who are taking anticoagulants such as warfarin.

Use Direction

Clofre is an oral medication taken once daily without regard to meals. The usual adult dose is 75 mg once daily but your doctor may adjust your dose based on your blood work or other medications you are taking. Swallow the tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not break, crush, or chew the tablet.

Storage Condition

Clofre should be stored at room temperature, away from heat and direct light. It should be tightly closed in a cool, dry place.

Volume of Distribution

The volume of distribution of clopidogrel is 11 liters.

Half Life

The half life of clopidogrel is approximately 7 hours.

Clearance

The clearance of clopidogrel is 11 liters/hour.

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