Extra Calcium

Extra Calcium, a brand name for a formulation containing essential Calcium, is widely used for various health benefits. This guide provides comprehensive information on the uses, dosage, side effects, and mechanism of action of Extra Calcium, as well as insights into how long it takes to work. Understanding these aspects can help you make informed decisions about its use and effectiveness.

Extra Calcium Introduction

Extra Calcium is a mineral found in many foods, whose chemical symbol is Ca and atomic number is 20. It is the most abundant mineral in the human body and plays a key role in many bodily functions, such as building strong bones and regulating muscle contractions. Although calcium is best known for its role in bone health, it is also essential for proper nerve conduction, enzyme activation, and hormone secretion.

Uses

Extra Calcium is most commonly taken as a dietary supplement to supplement dietary calcium intake, usually along with Vitamin D, to help maintain bone density and reduce the risk of osteoporosis. Extra Calcium may also be recommended for other conditions, such as high blood pressure, to help maintain healthy blood vessels. Additionally, calcium is sometimes recommended to help regulate blood sugar levels and reduce the risk of kidney stones.

Mechanism of Action

Extra Calcium's primary function in the body is to help maintain strong bones and teeth, although its effects reach far beyond that. Extra Calcium works by binding to proteins in the bones and other tissues, preventing calcification (hardening). This in turn helps to regulate the release of certain hormones, such as parathyroid hormone and calcitonin, both of which help regulate calcium levels in the blood. Extra Calcium also helps regulate nerve signals and muscle contractions, and is essential for clotting blood.

How Long Does It Take To Work?

Most of the time, calcium supplements take between one to two weeks to work. This is because it takes that long for your body to absorb and process the calcium. It can also take longer if you're taking multiple supplements or have underlying conditions that can affect your absorption of calcium.

Absorption

Extra Calcium is usually absorbed in the small intestine, and the amount of calcium that is absorbed depends on several factors. These include the form of the supplement (intact or chelated), the amount of dietary calcium present, the presence of other nutrients such as Vitamin D, and high fat or fiber levels. The bioavailability of calcium supplements is typically between 25 and 50%.

Route of Elimination

Extra Calcium is eliminated from the body primarily through feces, with around 40 – 70% of ingested calcium being eliminated in this way. The remaining calcium is eliminated through urine.

Dosage

The recommended dietary allowance for calcium for adults aged 19-50 years is 1000 mg/day, although this may vary depending on age and gender. Calculcium supplementation may be warranted for individuals who are at risk for calcium deficiency, such as those with poor dietary habits, limited exposure to sunlight, or certain medical conditions.

Administration

Extra Calcium supplements are often taken with meals to increase absorption. However, they can also be taken anytime during the day with or without food. Extra Calcium carbonate should be taken with food for better absorption, while calcium citrate does not need food for absorption.

Side Effects

Extra Calcium supplements can cause mild side effects, such as constipation, bloating, and gas. Taking calcium at bedtime can also lead to disturbed sleep and vivid dreams. Other potential side effects include kidney stones, increased risk of heart attack, and increased risk of death in people with advanced stages of cancer.

Toxicity

When taken as directed, calcium supplements are generally safe for most people. However, taking too much calcium can cause serious side effects, such as kidney stones, disruption of the normal balance of calcium and phosphorus in the body, and even calcification (hardening) of the tissue. Extra Calcium toxicity occurs when intakes of calcium exceed the body’s capacity for absorption and/or excretion.

Precautions

Extra Calcium supplements should be taken with caution in individuals with a history of kidney stones or those predisposed to calcium-oxalate stones. Additionally, those taking medications (especially thiazide diuretics) or other supplements containing calcium should speak to a doctor before adding calcium supplements to their regimen.

Interactions

Extra Calcium can interact with certain medications, vitamins, and other supplements, with some of these interactions being potentially serious. It is important to tell your doctor about any medications, vitamins, and supplements you are currently taking before taking calcium supplements.

Disease Interactions

Certain medical conditions can increase the risk of adverse effects when taking calcium supplements. These medical conditions include end-stage renal disease, sarcoidosis, certain types of cancer, and vitamin D deficiency.

Drug Interactions

Extra Calcium supplements can interact with certain medications, including thiazide diuretics, calcium channel blockers, and certain antibiotics. These interactions can lead to serious adverse effects, such as increased risk of kidney stones.

Food Interactions

Extra Calcium can interact with foods, making certain foods more or less available to the body. For example, excess fat and fiber can reduce calcium absorption, while milk protein and Vitamin D can enhance it. Extra Calcium supplements should be taken with meals to maximize absorption.

Pregnancy Use

Extra Calcium supplements may be recommended during pregnancy to help maintain maternal and fetal calcium levels. However, pregnant women should always speak to their doctor before taking any supplement.

Lactation Use

Extra Calcium supplements may be recommended to lactating women to help maintain maternal calcium levels. Women who are breastfeeding should always speak to their doctor before taking any supplement.

Acute Overdose

Taking too much calcium can lead to severe symptoms, such as vomiting, nausea, constipation, and excessive thirst. It is important to seek medical attention immediately if you think you have taken too much calcium.

Contraindications

People with certain medical conditions should not take calcium supplements. These include individuals taking certain medications, such as thiazide diuretics and calcium channel blockers, and those with end-stage renal disease, sarcoidosis, certain types of cancer, or vitamin D deficiency.

Use Direction

Extra Calcium supplements should be taken as directed by your doctor or pharmacist to ensure safe and effective use. Extra Calcium carbonate should be taken with food for better absorption, while calcium citrate does not need food for absorption.

Storage Condition

Extra Calcium supplements should be stored according to the manufacturer’s instructions. In general, they should be stored in a cool, dry place away from heat, light, and moisture.

Volume of Distribution

Extra Calcium is distributed throughout the body, with the majority being stored in the bones. Extra Calcium is also found in the blood, soft tissues, and other bodily fluids.

Half Life

The half-life of calcium is variable and depends on the form of the supplement. Extra Calcium carbonate has a relatively long half-life of 12 hours, while calcium citrate has a shorter half-life of 6 hours.

Clearance

Extra Calcium is eliminated from the body primarily through the kidneys, with up to 70% of the ingested calcium being eliminated in this way. The remaining calcium is eliminated through urine and feces.

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